Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia

Delicious, herby, Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia. I can only describe it in two words.. SO GOOD! This bread is our take on the traditional focaccia but I can promise twice as delicious. Perfect for platters, sandwiches, or even served as a side for dinner. This super easy to follow recipe will help guide you through the process of making your own crispy on the outside, soft on the inside and totally delicious sourdough focaccia made from scratch!

a loaf of focaccia on a wire cooling rack with sprigs of rosemary and slices of focaccia on a wood plate

This focaccia has been a staple in my family for 10+ years! My mom has probably been making this about as long as she’s been making her classic no knead sourdough bread. It’s seriously one of my favorites! Delicious dipped in olive oil or made into something we call “everything but the kitchen sink” sandwich.

It’s vibrant, light, and always the perfect bread. It can be formed in THREE different styles. Traditional, freeform, or in a banneton.

We always choose a more freeform type style because it is SO easy but, to be totally honest, they are all pretty simple and easy. Just require different tools or pans. Whatever you have access to, you can always make this delicious bread!

sliced rosemary focaccia on a wooden plate with a loaf of focaccia in the background

how to make sourdough rosemary focaccia

First things first, gather water, sourdough starter, and flour.

sourdough starter, flour, and water in small glass bowls

Combine all ingredients in a large glass bowl and whisk together until smooth. Pour into a dough rising bucket and let sit at room temperature for 3-4 hours. Place in the refrigerator overnight.

The next morning, take the poolish about 30 minutes before you’re ready to bake.

Gather all the other ingredients, including the poolish.

ingredients for sourdough rosemary focaccia

Place poolish, olive oil, and water in the mixer.

Stir in the flour and yeast until it just barely becomes a rough dough.

Now, stir in the chopped rosemary. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

Thoroughly stir in the salt. Add dough to bucket and cover.

Every 30 minutes during the first hour and a half of rising time turn the dough out onto a heavily floured surface and fold the top third of the dough down. Then fold the bottom third up. Repeat with the sides. Place the dough seam side down back into container. After the hour and a half, leave it alone for the rest of the time.

After rising time, turn dough out onto a heavily floured surface.

Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia dough turned out onto a heavily floured marble counter

From here, you have a few options. This is where you get to choose how to shape your dough! You can shape for a banneton, place into a pan and gently press it down to cover the entire bottom of the pan, or gently press down on a piece of parchment to a freeform shape. Whatever shape you choose, cover and let rise for 3 hours.

Once the dough is done with it’s final proof, place the dough in a preheated oven. If you chose the banneton, turn it out into a preheated dutch oven, if you chose the traditional shape then dimple the top of the bread all over with floured fingers and place in the oven, if using the freeform shape then place directly onto the baking stone. Close the oven door and bake until light golden brown, about 12-15 minutes. Take out of the oven and let cool.

sliced focaccia on a wooden plate with sprigs of fresh rosemary

how to store

Thankfully, this is so easy (and just like the rest of our breads on the blog!). If you don’t want to eat the dough immediately after cooking, let it cool and wrap in foil. You can store it in the freezer for months! To thaw, just place in a 350 degree oven for a while. If you want to store leftovers from dinner, just place in a sealable bag and place in the fridge. You can also use the oven to reheat it and crisp it up.

expert tips:

  • To be honest, this is a pretty long recipe in terms of waiting time. If you get to the final proof and it’s getting late, mist the tops of the bread with cooking spray, cover with plastic wrap, and pop in the refrigerator. The next morning, pick back up with Step 15 on the recipe card!
  • If you would prefer to use a Dutch oven, make sure you preheat it before you turn the bread into it.
  • Set a timer to help remind you with turning the dough.
  • Make sure to chop the rosemary for better distribution! You can also use a food processor.
  • Rice flour works the best to flour the banneton with to prevent sticking.
  • This recipe freezes really well!

When you make this Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia, leave a comment down below! We love hearing from you and answering any questions you might have! Also, be sure to tag us on social media and hashtag it #MSDeltaHospitality.

a loaf of focaccia on a wire cooling rack with sprigs of rosemary and slices of focaccia on a wood plate

Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia

Traci
Soft & fluffy interior with a crisp, perfectly golden brown exterior, every bite of this Sourdough Rosemary Focaccia is exactly what focaccia should be! SO. GOOD.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Additional Time 2 d
Total Time 2 d 45 mins
Course Sourdough
Cuisine Italian
Servings 1 loaf
Calories 435 kcal

Ingredients
 

Poolish-Style Sourdough Base

Bread

  • All of the poolish
  • ¾ cup lukewarm water
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 ⅛ cups flour
  • ½ teaspoon instant yeast
  • cup loosely packed rosemary leaves chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt

Instructions

For The Poolish:

  • Combine starter, flour, and water.
  • Mix thoroughly.
  • Pour into a clean glass bowl or plastic container.
  • Cover with lid or plastic wrap.
  • Allow to sit at room temperature for 3-4 hours, until nearly doubled.
  • Place in refrigerator overnight.

For the bread:

  • Remove poolish from refrigerator 30 minute – 1 hour before you are ready to cook.
  • Combine poolish, water, and olive oil. Mix well.
  • Stir in flour and yeast just to a rough dough.
  • Add rosemary. Mix in.
  • Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.
  • Stir in the salt thoroughly.
  • Place dough in clean glass bowl or plastic container.
  • Cover and let rise for 5-6 hours total. Every 30 minutes during the first 1 1/2 hours of rising time (at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 90 minutes) turn dough out onto a heavily floured surface and fold the top third of the dough down. Then fold the bottom third up. Repeat with the sides.
  • Place seam side down back into container.
  • Leave alone for the rest of the time.
  • Turn dough out onto a floured surface.
  • If using a banneton to shape, round the dough and place it in heavily floured banneton.
  • Or, place the dough on a rectangle of parchment and press out gently into an 8"X12" rectangle.
  • Alternatively, for a more traditional look, you can place it in an 8"X12" pan that has been coated with cooking spray.
  • Whichever shape you decide to proof, cover the dough and let it rise for 3 hours.*
  • While the dough is on its final rise, preheat baking stone on the middle rack (unless you are proofing in a pan, then you don’t need the stone) and a pan placed on the bottom rack to hold water to 450 degrees.
  • If using a banneton to proof, turn the dough out onto a piece of parchment and slide it onto a peel (or the back of a sheet pan).* If proofing directly on parchment paper, just slide onto peel. If proofing in a pan, dimple the top of the bread all over with floured fingers. Slide the bread into the oven and carefully pour water into the preheated pan on the bottom oven rack.
  • Close door and bake until light golden brown, about 12-15 minutes.
  • Cool on wire cooling rack.

Notes

  • To be honest, this is a pretty long recipe in terms of waiting time. If you get to the final proof and it’s getting late, mist the tops of the bread with cooking spray, cover with plastic wrap, and pop in the refrigerator. The next morning, pick back up with Step 15 on the recipe card!
  • If you would prefer to use a Dutch oven, make sure you preheat it before you turn the bread into it.
  • Set a timer to help remind you with turning the dough.
  • Make sure to chop the rosemary for better distribution! You can also use a food processor.
  • Rice flour works the best to flour the banneton with to prevent sticking.
  • This recipe freezes really well!

Nutrition

Serving: 1/6Calories: 435kcalCarbohydrates: 83gProtein: 12gFat: 6gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 5gSodium: 1065mgFiber: 5g

Nutritional information is only an estimate. The accuracy of the nutritional information for any recipe on this site is not guaranteed.

When you make this recipe, remember to tag @abakers_table or hashtag it #BakersTable!

𝓎𝑜𝓊 𝓂𝒶𝓎 𝒶𝓁𝓈𝑜 𝓁𝑜𝓋𝑒…

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