Multigrain Sourdough Bread

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This Multigrain Sourdough Bread is guaranteed to be your new favorite bake! A crunchy crust on the outside, light and soft on the inside, and loaded with FIVE different whole grains. It’s truly the most delicious sourdough bread. The best part? It’s SO much better than store-bought…and makes beautiful companion to your breakfast or dinner table. It’s actually so much easier to make than you would think and oh so impressive. Best served toasted with a generous smear of salted butter or even thinly sliced avocado. Trust me, you will LOVE this bread. It’s the good-for-you sourdough you’ve been waiting for. Serve alongside your favorite breakfasts for a wonderful and healthy toast, with dinner, or simply on its own. SO. GOOD.

two halves of multigrain bread leaning against each other on wire cooling rack with vase of wheat and stack of white plates behind

→ This post is also available as a Web Story: Multigrain Bread

About The Recipe

Just three words. Multigrain. Sourdough. Bread. Ohhhh, yes. Sourdough baking just got a whole lot better.

After you all LOVED our Fig and Walnut Bread so much, we decided to share one of our favorite breads to eat! We discovered a multigrain sourdough in Florida at our local grocery store. It was our absolute FAVORITE, but after we moved a few years ago, we haven’t been able to find a suitable replacement. Nowhere here sells a multigrain sourdough.

So, after two years of searching, my mom decided that she would develop her own! It’s taken quite a few test bakes to get it just right, but we finally achieved it! There’s just enough sourdough to give it plenty of sour flavor, while hints of grains compliment the overall flavor. It’s truly is SO good.

Though, this bread is made a little unconventionally. We love a traditional sourdough as much as anyone else, but it just takes so. long. I mean, it’s sooooo worth it, but if you could have a loaf of sourdough just a little faster, wouldn’t you prefer that?

Well, with this recipe, that’s just the case! We added just a little bit of yeast to help with the rise, as we have a lot of grains in this bread. Old-fashioned oats, flaxseeds, steel cut oats, sunflower seeds, PLUS whole wheat! It is the ultimate multi-grain bread, but it needed a little bit of help from the yeast.

cut sourdough bread on parchment paper on a wire cooling rack with plates and small scalloped bowl behind

But don’t let the addition of yeast deter you. This multigrain sourdough is ABSOLUTELY delicious and oh so worth the wait. Every bite is nutty, full of flavor, with just the right amount of sour flavor from the sourdough starter.

Why You Need Make This Multigrain Sourdough Bread ASAP!

  • It’s healthy AND delicious!
  • This bread is naturally vegan.
  • Made with a blend of whole wheat flour and bread flour.
  • A perfect use for sourdough.
  • Gives you delicious loaf of bread to enjoy in the mornings!
bread on wire cooling rack with parchment paper, slices laying in front and behind, and a vase of wheat

Equipment Needed

Ingredients

(Full ingredient amounts and instructions can be found in the recipe card at the bottom of the post)

For The Whole Wheat Starter:

  • Sourdough Starter
  • Water
  • Whole Wheat Flour
sourdough starter, whole wheat flour, and water in small bowls

For The Soaker:

  • Flaxseeds
  • Steel Cut Oats
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Old Fashioned Oats
  • Salt
  • Boiling Water
sunflower seeds, old fashioned oats, salt, flaxseeds, steel cut oats, and water on marble surface

For The Final Dough:

  • Bread Flour
  • Water
  • Instant Yeast
  • Honey
  • All of the starter
  • All of the soaker
dough, yeast, seeds mixture, flour, water, and honey on marble surface

How To Make Multigrain Sourdough Bread

Step 1: Make the whole wheat starter and soaker

The night before you want to bake the bread, you will need to make the whole wheat starter and the soaker. First we are going to make the starter. To do this, combine water and sourdough in a glass bowl and whisk until well combined and there are no lumps of starter.

Add in the whole wheat flour and beat well. Proof at 70 degrees for 12-16 hours (If you’re not using a proofing box, cover the starter with plastic wrap and set aside for 12-16 hours).

In a new bowl, combine the flax seeds, steel cuts oats, sunflower seeds, old fashioned rolled oats, salt, and boiling water. Stir until combined. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to stand at room temperature for 12-16 hours.

Step 2: Make the final dough

The next morning, combine the bread flour, water, yeast, honey, the starter, and the soaker in the bowl of an electric mixer. Mix on low speed for 3 minutes. Switch to dough hook, if using. Increase speed to medium and continue to mix for 3-4 minutes.

Step 3: Proof

Turn the dough into a clean glass bowl and proof at 78 degrees for 1 hour (cover with plastic wrap if not using a proofing box).

Step 4: Shape and proof

Turn the proofed dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gently deflate.

Fold the top third of the dough over towards the middle. Fold in the right and left corners. Roll dough towards you, tucking it tightly. Tuck ends under. Use a bench knife, or your hands, to round and tighten the dough.

Place the shaped dough, bottom side up, in prepared banneton. Proof at 80 degrees for 1 hour (cover with a tea towel or plastic wrap if not using a proofing box).

Step 4: Score and bake

Turn loaf out onto a piece of parchment paper and score the bread.

Carefully, place bread in preheated Dutch Oven and cover with lid. Bake at 450 degrees F for 15 minutes. Lower the oven temperature to 425 degrees F and take off the lid and bake for another 30 minutes. Take out of oven and let cool completely before serving.

multigrain bread on wire cooling rack with white napkin and wheat stems behind

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I make a sourdough starter? If you don’t have a sourdough starter, there’s no worries! You will need 5 days to make a sourdough starter. Use our recipe and guide How To Make A Sourdough Starter In 5 Days to make one!

Why is there yeast in this recipe? This bread needs all the help it can get! It not only has a LOT of additives that weigh it down, but it’s also made with whole wheat flour. While making it without yeast is possible, we wouldn’t recommend it. Adding the yeast helps give it some much-needed lift.

Why did my bread not rise in the oven? This could be so many things from the dutch oven not being preheated/preheated enough to the ingredients added to the dough. The most common problem is actually over-proofing. We highly recommend investing in a good quality proofing box to help with this issue. Though, if you follow the directions below exactly, you should have a perfect loaf every time!

What type of bread lame should I use? With so many different bread lames on the market, I’m sure it can be confusing. Each one is used for something specific, actually! A straight blade is used for normal scoring and decorative scoring. A curved blade is used for achieving that iconic ear you see in bakeries. While it’s possible to use each lame/blade for the opposite intention, it’s always best to try and use the tools as they were meant for. If you do not have a lame, we recommend in purchasing one, but a very sharp knife can be used.

How can I tell when the bread is properly baked? The most important thing is to follow the times and directions of the recipe card! Though, if you’re unsure, you can actually tap the bottom of the bread and listen. If the bread sounds hollow, it’s baked through! You could also use a thermometer to see if it’s cooked. A properly baked loaf of bread should read an internal temperature of 212 degrees F.

cut multigrain bread with three slices laying in front on wire cooling rack with a white napkin underneath and a stack of plates behind

What To Make With Multigrain Sourdough Bread

The wonderful thing about this multigrain bread is that it has so many uses! Below is a few of our favorites.

  • Toast for breakfast in the mornings.
  • Used as sandwich bread.
  • Served alongside charcuterie boards.
  • Chopped into cubes for croutons or savory bread pudding.

How To Store This Bread

Once this bread is baked and cooled, you can actually store it a few different ways! In a zip top bag and left at room temperatures for about 1 week, in the fridge for 1-2 weeks, OR wrapped with aluminum foil and kept in the freezer for up to 2 months!

Though, if kept in a zip top bag, this bread’s crust will soften and no longer be crunchy. Just keep that in mind! You can always slice it and toast it in the toaster or place the loaf in the oven for a few minutes to get the crust crunchy again!

flat lay of sourdough bread on wire cooling rack with white napkin, three slices laying in front, and oats scattered around

Expert Tips

  • If you’re new to sourdough and don’t have a starter, use our How To Make A Sourdough Starter in 5 Days guide!
  • If you already have a sourdough starter, but it seems to be a little sluggish/doesn’t have that healthy smell, we recommend giving it about a week of really working to revive it. You can find out how to do this/get more tips HERE!
  • Be sure to read through all the directions before beginning this recipe.
  • Use a tea kettle to safely boil the water needed for the soaker.
  • Do not use any roasted or salted nuts in this recipe.
  • You will need old-fashioned (rolled) oats AND steel cut oats.
  • Use glass bowls for the proofing.
  • If you are using a thermometer, after mixing, final dough should have a temperature of 78 degrees.
  • Rice flour works the best to flour your banneton to prevent sticking.
  • You can use a dutch oven or a baking stone to bake this bread.
  • If you are using a proofing box with a water tray, you will not need to cover the dough to proof it.
  • Remember to preheat either the dutch oven or baking stone!

When you make this Multigrain Sourdough Bread, leave a comment down below! We love hearing from you and answering any questions you might have! Also, be sure to tag us on social media and hashtag it #BakersTable.

two halves of multigrain bread leaning against each other on wire cooling rack with vase of wheat and stack of white plates behind

Multigrain Sourdough Bread

Traci
This Multigrain Sourdough Bread is not only very good for you, but it's also absolutely delicious! Truly the perfect addition to your morning breakfasts, afternoon sandwiches, or even dinner. SO. GOOD.
4.50 from 2 votes
Prep Time 25 mins
Cook Time 45 mins
Proofing Time 14 hrs
Total Time 15 hrs 10 mins
Course Breads
Cuisine American
Servings 12
Calories 133 kcal

Ingredients
 

Whole Wheat Starter

Soaker

  • Tablespoons flaxseeds
  • 2 Tablespoons steel cut oats
  • 3 Tablespoons sunflower seeds
  • 3 Tablespoons old fashioned rolled oats
  • teaspoons salt
  • ½ cup boiling water

Final Dough

  • 1⅝ cups bread flour
  • ½ cup water, lukewarm
  • teaspoon instant yeast
  • teaspoons kosher salt
  • teaspoons honey
  • All of starter
  • All of soaker

Instructions

Whole Wheat Starter

  • In a small glass bowl, whisk together starter and water.
  • Stir in flour.
  • Beat well.
  • Proof at 70 degrees for 12-16 hours. (If not using a proofing box, cover starter with plastic wrap.)

Soaker

  • In a small glass bowl, stir together flax seeds, steel cuts oats, sunflower seeds, old fashioned rolled oats, and salt.
  • Pour boiling water over the mixture.
  • Stir until combined.
  • Cover with plastic wrap.
  • Allow to stand at room temperature for 12-16 hours.

Final Dough

  • In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine bread flour, water, yeast, salt, honey, the starter, and the soaker.
  • Mix on low speed for 3 minutes.
  • Switch to dough hook, if using.
  • Increase speed to medium.
  • Continue to mix for 3-4 minutes.
  • Turn into a clean glass bowl.
  • Proof at 78 degrees for 1 hour. (Cover with plastic wrap if not using a proofing box.)
  • Line a round banneton with a cover or a tea towel.
  • Sprinkle with rice flour. Set aside.
  • Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface.
  • Gently deflate.
  • Fold the top third over toward the middle.
  • Fold in the right and left corners.
  • Roll dough towards you, tucking it tightly.
  • Tuck ends under.
  • Use a bench knife, or your hands, to round and tighten the dough.
  • Place it, bottom side up, in prepared banneton.
  • Proof at 80 degrees for 1 hour. (Cover with a tea towel or plastic wrap if not using a proofing box.)
  • While loaf is proofing, heat oven to 450 degrees F.
  • If you are using a cloche to bake, put that in the oven now. If you are using a baking stone, put that in the oven along with an empty sheet pan or cast iron skillet on the rack below the stone.
  • Turn loaf out onto a piece of parchment paper.
  • Score, as desired.
  • Place in cloche and replace lid or use a peel to slide onto stone. If using stone, pour at least 2 cups water into empty pan as soon as you put the bread on the stone.
  • Close oven door immediately.
  • Bake for 15 minutes.
  • Lower temperature to 425 degrees F. If using a cloche, remove the lid now.
  • Continue baking an additional 30 minutes. If loaf is getting too brown, lower the oven temperature another 25 degrees.
  • Remove from oven.
  • Place loaf on a wire cooling rack.
  • Allow to cool completely, about 1 1/2-2 hours, before slicing.

Watch How To Make This Recipe Below!

Notes

  • If you’re new to sourdough and don’t have a starter, use our How To Make A Sourdough Starter in 5 Days guide!
  • If you already have a sourdough starter, but it seems to be a little sluggish/doesn’t have that healthy smell, we recommend giving it about a week of really working to revive it. You can find out how to do this/get more tips HERE!
  • Be sure to read through all the directions before beginning this recipe.
  • Use a tea kettle to safely boil the water needed for the soaker.
  • Do not use any roasted or salted nuts in this recipe.
  • You will need old-fashioned (rolled) oats AND steel cut oats.
  • Use glass bowls for the proofing.
  • If you are using a thermometer, after mixing, final dough should have a temperature of 78 degrees.
  • Rice flour works the best to flour your banneton to prevent sticking.
  • You can use a dutch oven or a baking stone to bake this bread.
  • If you are using a proofing box with a water tray, you will not need to cover the dough to proof it.
  • Remember to preheat either the dutch oven or baking stone!

Nutrition

Serving: 1sliceCalories: 133kcalCarbohydrates: 23gProtein: 5gFat: 3gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 245mgPotassium: 80mgFiber: 2gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 2IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 15mgIron: 1mg

Nutritional information is only an estimate. The accuracy of the nutritional information for any recipe on this site is not guaranteed.

When you make this recipe, remember to tag @bakerstble or hashtag it #BakersTable!

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4 Comments

  1. I made your recipe and it was very good but it seems like some salt is missing. I expected to be adding additional salt with the flour. (Total about 1 Tablespoon in all). Am I wrong?

    1. Hi Linda! You are not wrong. I went back and looked at my formula. It is definitely short about 1 1/2 teaspoons. I must have just missed it when I was typing it in. Thank you so much for calling it to my attention! I will get it fixed immediately.

  2. 4 stars
    Your recipe instructions indicate the lid stays on the cloche during the entire baking time. Every recipe I’ve used up until now, always say to remove the lid at some point. I just to make sure the lid stays on the entire time. Correctz?